Brake grinding as 95 legacy stops

Discussion in 'Subaru Legacy' started by mp, Apr 1, 2004.

  1. mp

    mp Guest

    I have a 95 legacy wagon. the other day I noticed a grinding noise in the
    front driver side brakes when the legacy came to a stop. The grinding did
    not appear to be there through out the braking, just in the last few
    feet/rotations/etc.

    I pulled the tires all the way around and all of the pads (4wheel disc) have
    plenty of material left.

    I removed the pads from the front driver side & the rotor *looks* fine and
    the pads are fine. After reassembly, the grinding went away for a drive
    cycle, and then came back again today, a lot louder.

    I removed the caliper today & the rotor about fell off the hub.

    The Chilton's manual (only one I could find) said that you need to remove
    the castle nut and then thread bolts into the rotor to push it away from the
    hub. Mine came right off & I do not know why the castle nut would need to
    be loosened.

    I checked everything out. Reassembled everything. And took the car for a
    spin around the block

    There was no grinding. I haven't had a chance to drive it again.

    So, the pads are fine. The rotors *look* fine. And after
    disassembly/reassembly, the grinding goes away for a period of time.

    I've done a bunch of searches on the newsgroup & the web. The only good
    reason I have come up w/ is from a 1997 post:
    "rough section on the brake pad" - & that some semi-mettalic pads may be
    flawed and have *harder* areas than others - sounds like an urban myth to
    me.

    Any thoughts?
     
    mp, Apr 1, 2004
    #1
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  2. mp

    John Guest

    My 95 works the same way, the rotor is not held on by the castle nut, the
    wheel hub is.
    The rotor is actually held on when you place the wheel and lug nuts back on.

    If in doubt, turn the rotors to see if that helps any. Metallic pads have
    always had a bit of grinding.
    Depending on where you live, dirt/dust/sand/salt can be a factor. I know
    winter here in the NE is hell on rotors especially if you have the open
    alloy wheels.
     
    John, Apr 3, 2004
    #2
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