How do Subs sell in Florida?

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by P T, Jan 23, 2005.

  1. P T

    P T Guest

    I'm in Minnesota. First Sub in August: a Forester. First AWD / anti-lock
    braking vehicle. Friday was our first significant snow, a good 6 or more
    (the storm that's hitting the east coast today.)

    The Forester rocks! I probably could have gotten through with a FWD car,
    but with the Sub, I never faltered :) It's like a snowthrower, you
    don't need them much, but when you do, you're really glad you have them.

    Even in the past 6 weeks, when roads were in standard winter driving
    condition (i.e. mediocre traction) I noticed I was seldom breaking loose
    (although my neighbor says I'm just not trying hard enough!)

    This leads me to two questions.

    How do other Subs handle in deep snow? I suspect part of my success was
    due to the high clearance of the Forester.

    How do Subs sell in the sun belt? I would think AWD would have little
    appeal in Florida.

    Keep on truckin' Pete
     
    P T, Jan 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. P T

    LB Guest

    I leave in Seattle. With all the skiing, biking and hiking it seems like
    that every other car around here is Subi. I just went to Florida and I go to
    So. California all the time. For 1 week in FL I saw 1 or 2 sub, the same in
    CA.

    I can't imaging that these cars sell anywhere other then place where you
    truly need 4 wheel drive.
     
    LB, Jan 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. P T

    Generic Guest

    Yes and no. In California there are pockets of Subaru drivers that largely
    fit the college/hippie/granola stereotype. The original eco-friendly SUV
    market. The buyer base expanded a lot when the Outback came out, but the
    core is still the same. The same group would otherwise get a Volvo, Saab or
    Audi--but all put together these form at most 5% of the market.

    The WRX racing crowd is entirely unrelated and AWD is just one aspect of its
    appeal.

    -John
     
    Generic, Jan 23, 2005
    #3
  4. P T

    y_p_w Guest

    I see a lot of Subarus here in the San Francisco Bay Area. It's snowed
    maybe twice in the last 20 years (and barely at that). There are lots
    of Outbacks, Legacies, and Foresters used primarily as family cars.
    Some are probably taken into snow country. For the typical Subaru buyer
    in this area, AWD is probably secondary to whether or not rest of the
    car appeals to the buyer. I see plenty of AWD vehicle around here, and
    it's sometimes a selling point, albeit a secondary one.

    Now I hear the granola type living in the woods up in Northen California
    love Subarus for their capbilities on unpaved gravel or dirt roads.
    I've got a WRX, but there's no racing or track use.
     
    y_p_w, Jan 23, 2005
    #4
  5. P T

    MN Guest


    Almost every other car is a Subaru in Reno, NV; they are immensly popular
    in Northern Calif. Places like Auburn, CA, the Sierra foothills in general,
    and
    particularly Lake Tahoe area (Truckee, Kings Beach, S.Lake Tahoe, Incline
    Village).

    Resale values are good, dealerships and independent shops abound.
    Plenty of people with 'vintage' cars.

    Now Florida, I wonder.

    Lets not forget that Subaru is not all about AWD. Their cars in general
    are nice, and the boxer engine rather unique or altogether unavailable
    in an inexpensive car.

    There should be plenty of people owning Subarus in Florida, but I suspect
    there aren't. Why?

    Is the small added cost of AWD such a powerful deterrent, or something
    else? Insurance cost, lack of dealerships? Anyone from Florida care
    to reply?

    I plan on moving to Florida soon, should I take my Subaru with me,
    or is selling it and buying something else a better idea?

    MN
     
    MN, Jan 23, 2005
    #5
  6. P T

    KLS Guest

    Our 1999 Legacy OBW is lovely in deep snow provided one doesn't perch
    it on a fulcrum; driving intelligently is still necessary for full AWD
    advantage.

    We drove said car to Pensacola in November 2003 and didn't see another
    Subaru once we got south of Ohio, not even in the mountains of
    Kentucky and Tennessee. We only saw 4x4 trucks and American sedans
    and various Japanese front-wheel cars.
     
    KLS, Jan 23, 2005
    #6
  7. P T

    jabario Guest

    Look at the dealer locator on subaru.com. There are only a few dealers
    in TX and they are far apart. Different regions have different sales
    numbers.
     
    jabario, Jan 23, 2005
    #7
  8. I live halfway between Seattle and Canada, and every other car is a Subie. I
    spent a couple of weeks in Arizona recently, and rarely saw one. I never saw so
    many Hummers in my life, though. Sighting one of those is a rarity up here.

    When I bought my OBW four months ago, a friend who's a moderately granola type
    like me joked that I had got an SUV. I replied that he was right, but it's a
    blue state SUV, and there's quite a difference.
     
    John Rethorst, Jan 23, 2005
    #8
  9. P T

    y_p_w Guest

    Sure. As I recall someone from Finland once said, AWD/4WD only gets
    you going. If you're trying to slow down, it doesn't help you stop
    or steer.

    I've got a coworker with an Audi Quattro A4. He seems to think that
    his car with all-seasons should be more than adequate in deep snow.
    Of course he doesn't drive in that stuff 4 months a year, where
    snow/ice specific tires are always a great idea because the tread
    and softer rubber help with control and braking.

    I had a pet peeve with my old car ('95 Acura Integra GS-R). On a
    rainy day when I stopped behind a crosswalk or stop line, my front
    tires would lose traction on the painted lines in first gear. I'd
    take care of this by starting in 2nd gear. With my WRX, that has
    never been a problem, since the rear wheels had traction.
     
    y_p_w, Jan 23, 2005
    #9
  10. P T

    KLS Guest

    Your coworker is a moron. I also have the same car he has, but I am
    intelligent enough to have a separate set of wheels and snow tires for
    November-April, and in my case, my car is great. In deep snow, there
    are limits, hello. Geez! The A4 is not an SUV or a truck!

    I love both cars, but I love the A4 just that bit more; it handles
    better (the extra weight helps, plus the Audi AWS can't be beat) and
    is a dream to drive.
     
    KLS, Jan 23, 2005
    #10
  11. P T

    MikeL Guest

    I used to live in Pensacola... just recently in fact I left there and that
    is where (actually, Destin Beach -50 miles away - is where I bought it
    because there are no Subbie dealers in P.Cola). Anyway. I saw a multitude
    of WRX cars there. Then again the pan handle isn't much like the rest of
    the state, so who knows. I would think, however, that the AWD would be a
    nice feature in all that insane summer rain we got there.

    Just my two cents though....

    Mike
     
    MikeL, Jan 23, 2005
    #11
  12. P T

    BBB Guest

    Probably not as well as Buicks.
     
    BBB, Jan 24, 2005
    #12
  13. P T

    CompUser Guest

    Sounds like Santa Cruz, if it's still the way it
    was 15 years ago.

    I don't think many. I'm in southeast Ga, and see
    very few here and in north Florida. I drove up
    to NJ a year ago, and seemed as soon as I entered
    NJ, I was seeing Forester/Outbacks all over.
    Didn't see any WRXs at all...might have
    overlooked Legacys...but just a lot more up
    there. I'd guess it's pretty easy, if you don't
    have an annual, significant benefit from AWD, why
    bother paying the extra $$$?
     
    CompUser, Jan 24, 2005
    #13
  14. P T

    Generic Guest

    For sure. The SC mountains between SC and San Jose. Subaru Outback
    country.

    -John
     
    Generic, Jan 24, 2005
    #14
  15. P T

    Generic Guest

    For sure, it's a center for hippie/granola culture. The cars are almost
    Anything But American.
    As another said, the Blue State SUV.
    It's all about the image. "I could go skiing if I wanted to and people will
    think I'm an outdoorsy type."
    The point is it sells to younger street racers and the "Fast and the
    Furious" movie crowd. These are anti-granolas if anything.

    -John
     
    Generic, Jan 24, 2005
    #15
  16. P T

    JD Guest

    That's partially true. A lot of young guys want the WRX up here (I'm from
    Eastern Canada), but most people who own them are over 30, and bought them
    for the combination of performance and safety.

    I bought the STi. Most of my freinds who have toy cars, bought Corvettes
    and Vipers; which you can only drive for 3-4 months per year up here. The
    STi is great performance, and its fantastic in the snow; so I have an
    all-season toy. Performance Scoobies are popular here because of a
    combination of fun factor and practicality.
     
    JD, Jan 24, 2005
    #16
  17. P T

    Generic Guest

    You've got to be over 30 before the insurance on them drops to even the
    nosebleed level! I think interest in safety differs where climate isn't an
    issue, such as Los Angeles.
    In my experience many Corvette/Mustang and traditional muscle car buyers
    wouldn't be caught dead in a "rice rocket" like the STi. No V8, the wing,
    the fenders, the wheels. None of their friends know much about it. It's a
    big cultural split like mainstream rock vs. alternative rock or hip-hop.

    If only the new Legacy GT wasn't so boring looking!

    -John
     
    Generic, Jan 24, 2005
    #17
  18. P T

    Hallraker Guest

    I agree to that. Although I've never been fortunate enough to own a set of
    snow tires, I've always run expensive all-seasons. Adequate in the snow,
    but at least they aren't scary. My current tires, however, were purchased
    in an emergency and with very little money available (college lack of money
    time) so I ended up with objects that are less like tires and more like
    rubber circles that can be mounted on a rim, but would perform better
    mounted on a rope and used as a swing.

    The rubber compound is already pretty hard and cheap, even in the summer,
    and once it gets to around 40 degrees (F) those tires are rock hard, so you
    can imagine below freezing. Zero traction. It's like racing slicks on ice.

    -Matt
     
    Hallraker, Jan 24, 2005
    #18
  19. P T

    y_p_w Guest

    Well he's probably only taking it on weekend trips to Tahoe, and
    probably sticks to the main roads that get cleared. Still - there
    are chain restrictions in winter, and I'm sure if it's bad enough,
    they're going on AWD or not. Especially if the all-seasons are
    even partially worn.
     
    y_p_w, Jan 24, 2005
    #19
  20. P T

    Bobby Guest

    I bought my '02 OBW in Florida. Fort Walton Beach dealership to be exact.
    It is in the Panhandle (as noted earlier it isn't exactly like the rest of
    the state). Key buying points for me were safety, no matter how hard I
    tried in the test drive I couldn't get it stuck in the sand (can be a HUGE
    problem there), and I also couldn't get the sucker to hydroplane. I tried
    hard too!
    I never had trouble finding my car in a parking lot either, as it was rare
    to see another on the road much less in the same parking lot. When we (the
    missus and I) drove back to GA to visit family people would stare as they'd
    never even seen one before.

    Of course now I live in Alaska. I'm lucky if my license plate help me
    distinguish between my vehicle and the 40,000 others parked on the same
    parking row as me.

    --

    | I'm in Minnesota. First Sub in August: a Forester. First AWD / anti-lock
    | braking vehicle. Friday was our first significant snow, a good 6 or more
    | (the storm that's hitting the east coast today.)
    |
    | The Forester rocks! I probably could have gotten through with a FWD car,
    | but with the Sub, I never faltered :) It's like a snowthrower, you
    | don't need them much, but when you do, you're really glad you have them.
    |
    | Even in the past 6 weeks, when roads were in standard winter driving
    | condition (i.e. mediocre traction) I noticed I was seldom breaking loose
    | (although my neighbor says I'm just not trying hard enough!)
    |
    | This leads me to two questions.
    |
    | How do other Subs handle in deep snow? I suspect part of my success was
    | due to the high clearance of the Forester.
    |
    | How do Subs sell in the sun belt? I would think AWD would have little
    | appeal in Florida.
    |
    | Keep on truckin' Pete
    |
     
    Bobby, Jan 24, 2005
    #20
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