does anyone use K&N air filters?

There is no better purchase for your vehicle than a K&N filter. You
will notice increased throttle response and better mileage. The best
part is that you can clean it and it will last forevever in your car.
Spending $20 for a paper filter is folly when you can spend $50 and
have it last for as long as you have your car. Some naysayers are
sure to post but you can disregard them.
 
Has anyone actually compared the filtration area, effectiveness, etc on
these air filters?

I know of independent studies made on oil filters, and the results were
less than obvious.
 
Well, after asking my question decided to surf the web and found one
test made by someone that understands what all of it is about.

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/airfilter/airtest3.htm

I am sure a car would perform much better, if just for a while, without
the restriction that and air filter imposes, but to me, not in the
racing high performance circle, the air filter function is to protect
the engine.

Good Luck!
 
I say get the K&N. There is no evidence of widespread engine damage
due to their use, no class action suits etc. I personally used one
for over 110k miles on a 94 Trooper in on and off road usage. Vehicle
was retired due to being totalled by errant driver and at ~145k miles
there was no indication of impending engine failure. So when I bought
my 04 outback I installed a K&N shortly after purchase. Now at 83k I
have had no issues. Does any filter catch 100%? No. Regular oil
changes eliminate dirt and dust too.
 
AS said:
Well, after asking my question decided to surf the web and found one
test made by someone that understands what all of it is about.

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/airfilter/airtest3.htm

I am sure a car would perform much better, if just for a while, without
the restriction that and air filter imposes, but to me, not in the
racing high performance circle, the air filter function is to protect
the engine.

Good Luck!
Hi,
I use foam filter impregnated with oil. Wash it every two years.
When I see all the fine dirt the filter caught, I know it's doing the
job. Wash, clean it, spray very very thin layer of oil, wipe off excess
put it back, use it over and over. My reason is economy rather than
using throw away type paper filter. I don't race.
 
coaster said:
i am considering one for 2005 Forester ... are these air filters worth the
money?

Hi,

I haven't used the K&N--did use an Amsoil "oiled foam" model years ago.
Next door neighbor installed a complete K&N intake system on a Mazda
Miata earlier this year.

His comments:

--Don't expect huge increases in power or fuel economy. The most
noticeable savings will most likely come from NOT throwing away a paper
unit a couple of times a year.

--With the complete intake system, the overall noise level in the engine
compartment increased. A lot!

--Some aftermarket parts require emissions testing and approval from a
regulatory agency to be "legal" for street use. If there's an underhood
sticker in the package w/ an "emissions approval" seal or number (CARB
number here in California, or anything apropos to your locality), be
sure to install it. The fellow who did his last smog test told him he
was fine, as he'd installed the sticker K&N sent in the kit. W/o it, the
car would fail the "visual" part of the test because of "non-factory"
modification. I dunno about other localities and their practices. Just
installing the filter w/o any other mods shouldn't be problematic in
this department.

Rick
 
coaster said:
i am considering one for 2005 Forester ... are these air filters worth the
money?

I've had one, and found it to be too much work. I am also concerned about
oil and the MAF sensor; K&N says no problem, TSB's say otherwise. I will
stick to paper. I did find this test and learned a lot about filters. The
graphics take a bit to get loaded.

http://www.duramax-diesel.com/spicer/index.htm


--
Steve
ASE Master Tech
L1 Diag
Currently residing at a Subaru Shop
4.5 years doing tires and alighnments
 
Tony Hwang said:
Hi,
I use foam filter impregnated with oil. Wash it every two years.
When I see all the fine dirt the filter caught, I know it's doing the job.
Wash, clean it, spray very very thin layer of oil, wipe off excess
put it back, use it over and over. My reason is economy rather than using
throw away type paper filter. I don't race.

what oil do you spray on the filter? is this after you washed with water?
thanks!
 
I've had one, and found it to be too much work.

Those willing to the work may save a few bucks over the long run, but
it is a lot of work.

Performance wise?

Looking at K&N's own graphs, most foam filter gains are at very high
RPM's, ~ 5000 RPM, nowhere near the 1500-3000 RPMs that most cars see
in normal driving. Even up the high range, the gains are at most a
few horses and not something all that noticeable.

On K&N's own published FAQ, they no longer claim a mileage increase,
only that "some customers have reported gains". I'd bet those folks
went from a dirty paper filter to a clean K&N. Similar gas mileage
gains probably would have been seen with a clean paper filter. I
think is was last year that the gov't clamped down on unsubstantiated
mileage claims in advertising.

On a fully prepared race car, with all kinds of mods that add a few HP
each, they all add up, so a K&N is probably useful. On a street car,
the biggest K&N performance gain will probably be from the decal or
the visual impact under the hood of a show car. <G>
 
Bonehenge (B A R R Y) said:
Those willing to the work may save a few bucks over the long run, but
it is a lot of work.

Performance wise?

Looking at K&N's own graphs, most foam filter gains are at very high
RPM's, ~ 5000 RPM, nowhere near the 1500-3000 RPMs that most cars see
in normal driving. Even up the high range, the gains are at most a
few horses and not something all that noticeable.

On K&N's own published FAQ, they no longer claim a mileage increase,
only that "some customers have reported gains". I'd bet those folks
went from a dirty paper filter to a clean K&N. Similar gas mileage
gains probably would have been seen with a clean paper filter. I
think is was last year that the gov't clamped down on unsubstantiated
mileage claims in advertising.

On a fully prepared race car, with all kinds of mods that add a few HP
each, they all add up, so a K&N is probably useful. On a street car,
the biggest K&N performance gain will probably be from the decal or
the visual impact under the hood of a show car. <G>

Very true..
Reading the perfornance charts on the link I posted, about how much dirt can
get through scares me. I don't rebuild my engine after each race... oops
most of us dont race!
Steve
 
coaster said:
what oil do you spray on the filter? is this after you washed with water?
thanks!
Hi,
The filter came with a spray can of oil. I think K&N has it too.
Yes I wash it in warm water.
 
Tony said:
Hi,
The filter came with a spray can of oil. I think K&N has it too.
Yes I wash it in warm water.

BTW, this filter kit is from Amsoil.
The trick is using oil very little. If it goes thru foam, there is a
risk it can screw up MAP sensor. I wash filter in summer time and dry it
well under hot sun, then spray oil very thinly on the foam intake side.
Squeeze it between newspaper sheets to soak up any excess oil.
Need to do this every other year for normal driving.
Using this since car was new and did not have any trouble.
 
BTW, this filter kit is from Amsoil.
The trick is using oil very little. If it goes thru foam, there is a
risk it can screw up MAP sensor. I wash filter in summer time and dry it
well under hot sun, then spray oil very thinly on the foam intake side.
Squeeze it between newspaper sheets to soak up any excess oil.
Need to do this every other year for normal driving.
Using this since car was new and did not have any trouble.

Winter bar chain oil (chain saw)) works good for air filters. Nice and
sticky.
You don't need much.
 
Those willing to the work may save a few bucks over the long run, but
it is a lot of work.

Performance wise?

Looking at K&N's own graphs, most foam filter gains are at very high
RPM's, ~ 5000 RPM, nowhere near the 1500-3000 RPMs that most cars see
in normal driving. Even up the high range, the gains are at most a
few horses and not something all that noticeable.

On K&N's own published FAQ, they no longer claim a mileage increase,
only that "some customers have reported gains". I'd bet those folks
went from a dirty paper filter to a clean K&N. Similar gas mileage
gains probably would have been seen with a clean paper filter. I
think is was last year that the gov't clamped down on unsubstantiated
mileage claims in advertising.


The difference is the change in engines.
Years ago, with carbs and first generation EFI, a blocked filter made
the engine run progressively richer as it plugged up.

With OBD2, in particular, this is no longer the case. The computer
adjusts the fuel to the amount of air available, keeping the mixture
more or less constant - so on today's engines a free flowing filter
does NOT affect fuel mileage. It CAN affect power output, but
generally only at high RPM when the engine air demand exceeds the
capability of the filter to supply it.
 
We can debate performance gains but the cost savings of cleaning make
it worthwhile


The difference is the change in engines.
Years ago, with carbs and first generation EFI, a blocked filter made
the engine run progressively richer as it plugged up.

With OBD2, in particular, this is no longer the case. The computer
adjusts the fuel to the amount of air available, keeping the mixture
more or less constant - so on today's engines a free flowing filter
does NOT affect fuel mileage. It CAN affect power output, but
generally only at high RPM when the engine air demand exceeds the
capability of the filter to supply it.
Ditto!
 
We can debate performance gains but the cost savings of cleaning make
it worthwhile

No arguement there. Had one on my first Aerostar - moved it to my
second Aerostar. Olso one on my daughter's Neon.

Likely saved over $200 over and above the cost on the two Aerostars
(about 400,000km betweeen them) and another 100 or more on the Neon
 
The difference is the change in engines.
Years ago, with carbs and first generation EFI, a blocked filter made
the engine run progressively richer as it plugged up.

With OBD2, in particular, this is no longer the case. The computer
adjusts the fuel to the amount of air available, keeping the mixture
more or less constant - so on today's engines a free flowing filter
does NOT affect fuel mileage. It CAN affect power output, but
generally only at high RPM when the engine air demand exceeds the
capability of the filter to supply it.

I agree on the OBD tuning, but disagree on the cost savings. I feel, and is
supported by the web page I posted, that the k&n lets too much dirt through.
You may save money in the filters, but think it isn't worth it to the life
of the engine.


--
Steve
ASE Master Tech
L1 Diag
Currently residing at a Subaru Shop
4.5 years doing tires and alighnments
 
StephenW said:
I agree on the OBD tuning, but disagree on the cost savings. I feel, and is
supported by the web page I posted, that the k&n lets too much dirt through.
You may save money in the filters, but think it isn't worth it to the life
of the engine.
Hi,
OBD tuning? Doesn't OBD mean on board diagnostics? What does it have
anything to do with tuning? When trouble occurs, ECU puts the engine in
default mode(limp mode) at least to get you moving with CEL on.
ECU has a limit, any filter has a limit. Even HEPA filter is not 100%.
I am sure reusable filter is economical for long run. It's matter of how
to use it. I never heard K&N filter caused engine damage. Did you?
Way back, oil bath filter was very common. Some even used toilet paper
roll in lieu of regular paper filter. In over 50 years driving I never
suffered an engine damage due to poor maintenance. I always keep my
vehicles in original condition. My rule of thumb to replace a car.
When it starts leaking oil. It happens when the car is around 10 years
old. I donate it to Kidney foundation, then go out buy new one with
cash saved over during that 10 years.
 

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