Updated posting: 96 Outback-overheating problem

Discussion in 'Subaru Outback' started by RAJP53, Dec 19, 2003.

  1. RAJP53

    RAJP53 Guest

    I poted an earlier message that the temp. gauge on my 160k miles '96 Outback is
    suddenly showing hot. There are times that cold air comes out instead of hot.
    The thermostat, the radiator and the sensor were all changed. It still reads
    between the middle and way beyond "H". There is no reduction in performance
    but still cold air comes out. The engine does not overheat and smoke. The
    mechanic showed me on a laser pointer thermometer that the engine temp is 229
    degrees with the radiator as 140 degrees. He says that's all normal. The
    mechanic now says it may be the gauge. Would that be the case even with the
    cold air. Any ideas? Pete D. suggested that ir may be an air bubble, and that
    the cooling system needs to be bled. He added that it happens because the
    heater radiator (or did he mean the heater core?) is mounted so high in the
    dash. The mechanic claimes that it was bled, but still the gauge goes up. (how
    can I check if he did bleed it?) However no smoke, no loss in performance. The
    engine and radiator are still running at temperatures noted earlier. Should I
    ignore the gauge or not? Could it be something else? Thanks for the time and
    ideas. Happy holidays to all! Ric
     
    RAJP53, Dec 19, 2003
    #1
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  2. RAJP53

    Edward Hayes Guest

    I'm thinking that there is air in the cooling system and since the heater
    core is high you may have air in the core or it is full of crud and blocked.
    I would first try to purge any air from the system. If that doesn't work
    then back-flush the heater core. If that doesn't work and you want heat then
    replace the heater core. eddie
     
    Edward Hayes, Dec 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. RAJP53

    RICHARD SOBE Guest

    Is the water pump working? With the radiator cap off, start the engine. When
    the engine gets hot enough for the thermostat to open, you should see the
    antifreeze "flowing" through the radiator via the top radiator hose. You can
    rev the engine at the carb and watch it speed up with the engine speed.
    Normally if the water pump isn't working you'd be overheating though.

    --
    Richard Sobe
    I poted an earlier message that the temp. gauge on my 160k miles '96 Outback
    is
    suddenly showing hot. There are times that cold air comes out instead of
    hot.
    The thermostat, the radiator and the sensor were all changed. It still
    reads
    between the middle and way beyond "H". There is no reduction in performance
    but still cold air comes out. The engine does not overheat and smoke. The
    mechanic showed me on a laser pointer thermometer that the engine temp is
    229
    degrees with the radiator as 140 degrees. He says that's all normal. The
    mechanic now says it may be the gauge. Would that be the case even with the
    cold air. Any ideas? Pete D. suggested that ir may be an air bubble, and
    that
    the cooling system needs to be bled. He added that it happens because the
    heater radiator (or did he mean the heater core?) is mounted so high in the
    dash. The mechanic claimes that it was bled, but still the gauge goes up.
    (how
    can I check if he did bleed it?) However no smoke, no loss in performance.
    The
    engine and radiator are still running at temperatures noted earlier. Should
    I
    ignore the gauge or not? Could it be something else? Thanks for the time
    and
    ideas. Happy holidays to all! Ric
     
    RICHARD SOBE, Dec 20, 2003
    #3
  4. RAJP53

    RICHARD SOBE Guest

    Is the water pump working? With the radiator cap off, start the engine. When
    the engine gets hot enough for the thermostat to open, you should see the
    antifreeze "flowing" through the radiator via the top radiator hose. You can
    rev the engine at the carb and watch it speed up with the engine speed.
    Normally if the water pump isn't working you'd be overheating though.


    --
    Richard Sobe
    I poted an earlier message that the temp. gauge on my 160k miles '96 Outback
    is
    suddenly showing hot. There are times that cold air comes out instead of
    hot.
    The thermostat, the radiator and the sensor were all changed. It still
    reads
    between the middle and way beyond "H". There is no reduction in performance
    but still cold air comes out. The engine does not overheat and smoke. The
    mechanic showed me on a laser pointer thermometer that the engine temp is
    229
    degrees with the radiator as 140 degrees. He says that's all normal. The
    mechanic now says it may be the gauge. Would that be the case even with the
    cold air. Any ideas? Pete D. suggested that ir may be an air bubble, and
    that
    the cooling system needs to be bled. He added that it happens because the
    heater radiator (or did he mean the heater core?) is mounted so high in the
    dash. The mechanic claimes that it was bled, but still the gauge goes up.
    (how
    can I check if he did bleed it?) However no smoke, no loss in performance.
    The
    engine and radiator are still running at temperatures noted earlier. Should
    I
    ignore the gauge or not? Could it be something else? Thanks for the time
    and
    ideas. Happy holidays to all! Ric
     
    RICHARD SOBE, Dec 20, 2003
    #4
  5. RAJP53

    RAJP53 Guest

    Maybe I should give up. The cooling system was bled, including the heater
    core. However, the gauge still runs up to beyond "H" after staying steady at
    the middle. The car ran in the stuck "H" plus position for over an hour in
    bumper-to-bumper traffic. When I finally shut the car off, I had some smoke
    coming from the engine. Maybe its worse that I thought? I am bringing it back
    to a mechanic tomorrow, but I'd like to know what to expect. Thanks for the
    attention and replies.
     
    RAJP53, Dec 24, 2003
    #5
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