Subie Newbie

Discussion in 'General Motoring' started by user, Jul 21, 2003.

  1. user

    user Guest

    Hello Everyone:
    My wife is in the market for a small 4wd.(She needs a vehicle she can
    enter easily as she has a bad back.) Over the last few days we have
    narrowed it down to a 2002 Outback H6-3.0 VDC Sedan.
    This vehicle was driven by the dealership owner and has 12k on it. It is
    in showroom condition and is being sold as a demo for $32K Canadian.
    Apparently they were 42K New. I am told the 94's do not have VDC.
    Can anyone advise me if this is a good buy and if there are any problems
    I should know about.

    Bill Spears
     
    user, Jul 21, 2003
    #1
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  2. user

    Ed Rachner Guest

    Ed Rachner, Jul 22, 2003
    #2
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  3. user

    Kurt Koller Guest

    But then your car has a lower bluebook the instant the model year changes
    over, so is $350 under invoice also under the current bluebook?

    Kurt
     
    Kurt Koller, Jul 22, 2003
    #3
  4. user

    H. Whelply Guest

    High test gas (i.e., premium, 91 octane) isn't as expensive as it may seem.
    Let's say you drive 12,000 miles a year, regular gas is $1.50 per gallon,
    premium is $1.70, your overall gas mileage is 20 MPG. You'd need 750 gallons
    of gas per year (15,000/20). So, that much regular will cost you $1,125 (750
    x $1.50), and the same amount of premium is $1,275. So, that's a grand total
    of $150 more per year for premium; or $12.50 more per month; or $2.88 more
    per week. Give up just one coffee at Starbucks per week, and you can afford
    to burn premium. (Besides, ever figure what you pay per gallon for
    Starbucks?!).

    I realize the examples above are based on assumptions that may or may not
    hold true, and YMMV. Further, if you can't afford an extra $150 per year,
    then you just can't. But the big point is (obviously): a car that requires
    premium gas isn't all "that" much more expensive to operate, and a premium
    requirement alone isn't a big enough deal to warrant eliminating a car from
    consideration.

    And, no, I don't have any connection to an oil company!

    Hal
     
    H. Whelply, Jul 25, 2003
    #4
  5. Also, you may very well get HIGHER MILEAGE which will offset (though
    doubtful cancel) the difference.

    Carl
    1 Lucky Texan
     
    Carl 1 Lucky Texan, Jul 26, 2003
    #5
  6. user

    user Guest

    Thanks Guys for the input.

    Bill
     
    user, Jul 26, 2003
    #6
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